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tv   Piers Morgan Live  CNN  August 7, 2013 12:00am-1:01am PDT

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burger emergency, continue call 911. in fact, call us. we're in the book under "ridicu-list." a super star's child in dangerer his son almost drowned today and he's in the hospital. it wasn't his fault. details on that. an escaped python kills two sleeping children. how did it happen snn why did it happen? should these deadly snakes ever be let out of zoos? we'll ask experts. a former gunman terp rises the courtroom. you won't believe what he said. is football ready for her. sarah thomas is hoping to be the first female official in the nfl. can she break the grass ceiling?
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see what i did there? sarah joins me live to give you the answer. let's get to the big story. r and b super star usher's new son rushed to the hospital in an almost drawning swimming pool incident. very potentially tragic incident here involving usher's son. to put it in contect, last year he lost his stepson in a jet ski accident soft nearly a double tragedy. tell me what happened. >> well, first of all, this happened on monday, piers, and his son was swimming in a swimming pool, we're told and this is according to the police report, swimming in a swimming pool and got his arm caught in the drain. like those things happen it seems like around water and accidents like that. the woman that was watching him, his aunt in a house, couldn't get him up but apparently there were some electrics, sound guys at the house doing some work, they ran out to see what the commotion was, were able to get him out of the water and do cpr and revive the boy. >> they called 911. here is the frantic call.
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we got a tape. >> my nephew was in the pool and he -- he went. i couldn't get him. i couldn't -- i couldn't get him. i tried to get him and they got him and doing cpr on him. he's five years old. >> okay. stay with me. is he awake? >> huh? >> is he breathing? >> is he breathing? is he breathing? >> he's breathing, yes, ma'am. >> very dramatic, obviously. thankfully, the boy, it's usher raymond the fifth is the boy's name. he's five years old and does appear to be okay tonight. but behind all this is the backdrop of an ugly divorce of him and his wife. >> i did speak to her. she said her son was okay. she didn't want to speak more. she had no other comment because there were reports she would ask for an emergency custody hearing because of what happened. i asked about that and she said i don't want to talk about that.
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i don't have any comment. she told me the kids were in the room with her. she presumably didn't want to talk with the children around, but yeah, you're right a very ugly divorce battle they had a. very ugly custody battle three years long and usher was finally awarded custody of the two boys after a three-year battle. >> and now we don't know what impact this will have because of course, timyka may, despite what she's not saying tonight may use this as a stick to beat usher and get custody. >> i think she will. there are reports she did file for an emergency custody hearing, that she feels like the boys aren't being taken care of properly and wants to reverse that because he has primary custody. she has limited visitation now. >> thankfully, the tragedy was averted it would seem. thank you very much indeed. and your new perm, the oh pra perm. >> i did it for you.
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>> a shocking story out of canada. two boys sleeping in a home killed by a python. the snake was said to be between 11 and 15 feet long. we have more on this horrific tragedy. this is a shocking story, isn't it. >> it's a tragedy and such an odd occurrence and so many questions that need to be answered. >> what do we believe happened here? they were on a sleep over, just above this pet store. where was this snake and how did it get out? >> from what i read and the information that's out currently is the snake escaped it's enclosure, which was on the pet store in the first floor and made it's way up the air ducts and just the sheer size and weight of the snake apparently caused this thing to drop through the air duct into the
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room, in the living room where the two boys were sleeping on a mattress on the floor. >> i did a recent show involving various animals, including a large python and having it in close proximity to me was a scary experience. it was a huge, huge thing and very menacing to be close. i can't image gin what it was like for the poor kids. i'm assuming they were constricted to death. do we believe that's the cause? >> that would be the cause of death involving a snake, especially of that size. keep in mind, piers, you've been in close proximity to a snake that size, as well as i have holding one physically and the sheer size, the muscles are incredible. you said it perfectly, they -- that's what they are built for is constriction. they don't have venom and a large african rock python 15 feet long will have quite a bit of squeezing power. the odd thing that we're considering is that typically,
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when a snake -- the two motivations for a snake to strike is one being out of fear and b, responding to a feeding response. let's say the snake dropped out and considered to -- wanting to make one of the small boy as potential pray item. the snake would have to strike the child first and then wrap around. so what's unusual is it's odd to think the kid wouldn't react. i would scream like a little girl if i was bit by a snake this size. you would wake up and the snake would proceed to wrap around and really where the killing potential comes from is they use their missiles to push against the diaphragm. so every time, in this case, if it was one of the children, every time the child exhaled the snake would press against the diaphragm causing him to eventually be affixuated. their eyesight is poor and rely on a sense of smell, at night solely to find pray. >> right, i mean, these two boys, conner 6 and noah four had
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been playing with animals earlier at the farm. i want to play a clip from the great uncle talking about that. >> the family went to the farm. there they played with lamb mas and goats and horses. they played with dogs and cats in the hay loft and went for a ride on the farm tractor and he let them steer the tractor. that's the type of life they have and that's what we'll remember. >> could it have been that the boys still had the scent of these animals that they had been playing with earlier? could that attract the snake, you think? >> absolutely. that would be a large contributing fact tore. for example, if this snake is used to eating and being fed on a regular basis and a pet store in a captive situation, that of a pet store, this snake was most likely fed rabbits and rats and the fact the children were playing with other animals earlier in the day would attract
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the snake much more than their own human body scent. >> jared miller, a terrible story and our heart goes out to the kids' poor family. they must be grieving. >> thank you. awful stories -- >> it really breaks your heart any time two little ones lose your lives. you started the show about another tragedy involving a child and then this, also. my heart bleeds for the mother and father in this case. >> do you know usher well? i know -- >> well, i've interviewed him before. i've obviously, talked to him and i've spoken to his ex-wife before. this is obviously, a household accident. this is something that happens in homes across our country. the people who have pools, are privileged enough to have pools, thank god there was somebody there to do cpr, to assist
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before the paramedics got there. you know, i'm unsure of why it's a national story. although, it's a tragedy, this is -- you want to care about little kids, there are some kids across the street in brooklyn we should be caring about. this child has a mother, father, nanny. thank god he's okay. >> it's a story because of usher's celebrity status. >> also, i heard you-all talking earlier about the possibility of timyka raymond seeking custody. when there is a custody battle the court decided solely on the best interest of the child. who is the best parent to have custody. unless you can show recklessness, negligence or abuse they won't really dus tush the custody -- >> we don't know what happened. there is no sign there is negligence, it seem s to be an awful accident. >> an awful accident. >> thank god the boy was okay.
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>> there is another quite dramatic story tonight, a california woman found dead in her home and an amber alert for her two children. california police waited 24 hours to put it out. it's nation-wide. what do you think of the alerts, people getting messages on their cell phone to encourage them to see hanna anderson and ethan anderson. >> they are extremely helpful. one of the first times i was here visiting with you, i talked about the tragic death of a family friend. >> right. >> and, you know, getting the word out as quickly as possible, is something that generates a lot of interest and a lot of tips. amber alerts work because people start to be on the alert. i'm a little concerned they waited 24 hours. there is no law that says you have to wait 24 hours. you may see that on law and order or one of the csi shows but you don't have to. if the police really do suspect there may have been foul play or
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there is a reason for these kids to be missing, they can go into action right away. >> if anybody is watching, looking at these pictures and see these kids anywhere, please do get in touch with the authorities. there is a suspect. james lee dimaggio. he's the prime suspect police want to get ahold of. if you see him or the kids, contact the police immediately. >> pay attention to things they put out in the amber alert, whatever car this suspect was driving at the time. >> right. >> what the suspect was wearing. what the kids were wearing. be on the lookout they can change appearances with die and/or wigs and/or hats so be on alert. >> the foot hood shooter, hasan, you were a former prosecutor. he said look, i was the shooter. is there a sensible way of spending public money?
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>> one of the first things you learn in law school, piers, any person that defends himself person that defends himself has a fool for a client. the silliest thing in the world. you want -- if you're going to go ahead and avail yourself of due process in the criminal justice system, then go ahead and get an attorney that can go in there and fight for your rights. >> but he's doing it, i would think, to turn the whole thing into a show circus -- >> a little bit. >> vent his views. he's still being paid and received hundreds of thousands of dollars since he shot so many servicemen. it seems like a complete outrage. >> it's a little outrageous but because he has a right to go pro se they need to find he had a mental disease -- >> what about the rights, star, of the victim that he shot who he may now have the legal right to interrogate? >> not may, does. >> how can that be right? >> because the criminal justice system is there where the
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defendant is innocent, unless and until proven guilty. >> even when he's admitted i'm the shooter. >> but admission of responsibility for the act is not admission of culpability under the law. >> do you mind if i say this is legal gooblededoo? >>ist one thing to admit i'm the person who committed the act. it's another to admit the act is a violation of the criminal law, the criminal law i've been charged with. that's where he's arguing. >> so it's a necessary evil? >> it's a necessary evil. it's not so much evil. i'm not going to let you go after the criminal justice system. everybody gets irritated with it, but it's the best system there is. i believe the american criminal justice system is the best there is, may not be perfect. when i'm the defendant, if i'm ever in that position, i want to put the state or the government to their burden.
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i want you to walk in there and prove my guilt and if you can't, i deserve to walk out. i deserve to avail myself of every law, rule, regulation. if you can't prove me guilty, i deserve to walk out of that courtroom. it may irritate the heck out of you, but if your son is sitting at that table, that's exactly what you want. >> star jones, as provocative as ever, thank you. you're a big yankees fan. >> yes. >> i want to talk to you about that disgusting little cheat, a-rod -- >> oh. >> excuse me, alex rodriguez, the hand some and powerful super star. >> still a yankee. >> that's what i meant to say. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know some owls aren't that wise? don't forget i'm having brunch with meghan tomorrow. who?
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0 back now with my special guest star jones. let's talk opra winfree. this is what she told my great friend larry king. let's watch this. >> i saw a sweater in the
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window. this was on madison avenue, and they wouldn't open the door, and they wouldn't open the door, and i am not the person who pulls the race card. so i'm like wow, gee, god, do they see us out here? >> what is amazing to that, she goes on to say this store on madison avenue, up the road from here a smart part of new york, manhattan, she rang up later and confronted them and somebody at the store admitted they had two black intruders break in the week before and therefore assumed the worst when they saw oprah. >> sounds george simm e man to me. >> sounds like profiling going on here. what do you make of this? >> i wish i could say i'm surprised. i think most people that are in new york and in california, smart people, people exposed get surprised when you hear a powerful african american woman or man identify that racism exists in the united states, and
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not alabama or mississippi. we're talking about new york city, madison avenue. >> have you experienced it in new york? >> not as much because new york is sort of my city, and i tend to go places where i'm expected. i think in someways, i've started to do that because i don't want to have these kinds of experiences. >> so you're almost avoiding it? >> exactly. i have been, you know, passed up by a taxi driver. i've also had a taxi driver yell something foul at me -- >> both of us. >> i have been. i might be more -- >> just because i'm annoying. >> where as i've had some foul "n" word yelled at me on a new york city street. >> have you really? >> absolutely in the middle of the street. >> they aren't talking to me. it's not what they call you, it's what you answer to. i know what i am and i won't allow anybody to put me in a box. >> has it gotten better since the first black president of the united states or not?
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>> yeah, it's not so much that it's gotten better. i think it's become more of a conversation, and, you know, the race conversation is one that black america has had regularly for a long period of time. this is now a conversation that white america is now being a part of. and in order for the conversation to turn into action, we need to be talking together. >> right. >> and we need to be sitting around the table exposing each other to different aspects of our lives. you know, the people whoever were in the madison avenue store when they saw oprah, black woman can't afford this why should i let her in when she can buy the store and put people working there -- >> like pretty woman, big mistake. >> she's being discrete in identifying the store. she could stand on the tv and say -- >> close it down.
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>> exactly. >> she compared killing of trayvon martin to emit in the 50s. there are two schools of thought about the zimmerman trayvon case, actually, it wasn't about race, others think its. what do you think of oprah leaking the emit case? >> the facts and circumstances were different but in terms of pif vot l and this case, no matter how people want to gloss over it, the zimmerman murder case was definitely involving race. there is no way you can make anybody with any good sense believe that george zimmerman would have been following a young white kid walking in that same neighborhood, would have stocked him, followed him, called police, done what the police told him not to. anyone with good sense believes
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that. so if we give that race at least was a factor, you're going to now say how do we learn something from this, as the president likes to say a teachable moment? the teachable moment is every young black man should not be presumed to be doing something wrong. we have to start that right here in the media. we have to stop putting images of african american young men on jump suits as the champ of who black men are. black men are teachers, police officers -- >> black men are presidents of the united states. >> of the united states. >> doesn't need to be a bigger endorsement to that, really. let's turn to a-rod. i've got no stomach for this whatsoever. the idea this guy is playing baseball for the yankees, shame on the yankees. >> put the proof out. i've been trying to focus on this. >> you think he's innocent? >> i would like to see proof. in the united states of america,
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when you accuse somebody of something, you have to present some evidence. >> star, even he doesn't denying it. >> he's appealing -- >> he's not denying it. he wants to go through the process. at no stage yesterday did he say it's not true. >> if you get told today that they no longer want you here at cnn, i guarantee you you going to ask them to go through the process. >> if i was the biggest abuser of drugs in the history of cnn i wouldn't expect to sit here. >> but you would expect them to go through due process. >> no, i think i would fall gently on my -- >> what i would do as your lawyer friend -- >> not to. >> please shut up and let me do the talking. >> what about the proper men -- >> why don't you think he's a proper man? >> i think he's a lying toe rag like lance armstrong being paid $270 million and taking us for a ride. alex rodriguez is a cheat. >> i've never in my life
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defended anybody who has taken drugs. >> why are you starting with him? >> i'm the corneyest 50-year-old there is. i've never smoked a joint but i would die for the law and the process. the process says if major league baseball accuses a-rod of something, put up or shut up. once they do, once they put up, then he's got to be off. until then, he has every right to play. we as yankee fans have every right to boo the hell out of him and the yankees got to write a check. that's the way it works. >> that's move on because that's not the way it should work. ms. jones, move on. hillary clinton is meeting with dr. mark himan and she needs to look skinnier and sharper. do we need to have a president who looks a certain way? can't we just have hilly the way she is? can we have someone like chris christie? does it matter?
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>> first of all, i don't know what is wrong with the way hilary looks now. >> i agree. >> one thing, number two, whether you're running for president or running to be the biggest soccer mom in your neighborhood, every woman needs to be healthy. and i think that this is extremely responsible of the secretary of state to say i'm going to put my health as a priority. when you're on a plane, the first thing they tell you is put your own mask on in case of emergency before you help people. she's putting on her own mask of health. regardless of what happens in 2016 she needs to be a happy person. >> winston smoked cigars, drank whisky and was the greatest prime minister and won a great war. >> heart disease is the number one killer of all americans, the number one killer of black americans and women, and i would say i'm three for three. go ahead, hilary, get your health on. >> [ laughter ]
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star jones come back soon. i love having you on. >> same here. president obama choosing a likely setting to make news about the terror threat. we'll have it for you coming next.
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president obama tonight using the tonight show to use news. he told jay leno the embassy closings in the wake of terror warnings are not an over reaction. he says americans should use common sense and russia giving know den asylum shows the u.s. has problems with russia. he said he will attend the g 20 summit in russia and spoke about his lunch with hillary clinton. let's watch this.
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>> you and hilary had lunch. who invited who to lunch? i'm curious? >> i invited her. >> okay. >> and we had a great time. she had that post administration glow when folks leave the white house. two weeks later they look great. >> with me tonight breaking the news colombia university professor marc lamont hill and josh. president obama said they take this threat very, very seriously and indicated what al qaeda had been trying to do is create something so dramatic, it would actually change the power structure in the middle east. we don't know what it is. what it was planned for. what do you think? >> it's a dangerous thing not just in libya but syria. we have serious questions about the role al qaeda is playing in opposition groups. the point is the obama
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administration said al qaeda was on heels and in control and now suddenly -- >> especially after the election. >> right. >> this narrative got them in trouble with benghazi -- >> exactly. >> they are awfully organized and offensively -- offensive minded to be on the heels. it changes the narrative the obama administration offered us. >> al qaeda is a different beast to what it was with osama bin laden. you got this global entity of cells, which may or may not be linked together, may be working entirely independently. very, very hard to take on an enemy like that. >> this is the problem with the war on terror, get osama bid laden and possible for new groups and cells to spring up. the situation we got we were able to have a return to normal where terrorism became a
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low-level threat, one of the things the president said in his interview with jay leno tonight, americans are much more likely to die in a car accident than terror attack. that's healthy the way they think of foreign policy and if there is a big event that happens in the middle east, i think it could change that in a negative way and force us, draw us back in. >> it has to be noted for the talk about the nsa and invasion of people's privacy and so on and so on they are successful in a huge atrocity. >> think not why we've been successful in preventing come mess tick terrier -- >> do we know that? >> i wouldn't want to yield my personal or pub securities. we see embassy bombings and terrorism spreading, as you said, cells spreading around the
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political and geographical middle east. i don't think we're in as great of shape as they say we are. >> hillary clinton, her 2016 campaign. how much of her potential success, if she does run, josh, will be determined by obama's last bit of rain as president in the sense of if he gets into a big mess with the middle east, if it does blow up. if there are al qaeda atrocities, this could impact her chance of success. >> in her service at as secretary of state and the policy record is a major asset in the campaign, the reason the benghazi issue hasn't stuck as a mass issue even though republicans are obsessed, it's a small blemish. if there were a big change soon of that some could stick to hilary. i think the longer hilary has been out of the administration the less blame.
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she's up 50 points in the primary. i think she's in a strong position in the primarily and elections. i don't think benghazi is a big deal for her. >> i want to talk about boobies with you. >> he gets benghazi and i get boobies? >> fair enough. >> the u.s. appeals court ruled this bracelet which says i heart boobies, keep a breast is not lewd and can therefore not be banned from pennsylvania schools. the teens involved testified they were trying to raise awareness of breast cancer in their schools and sued when they were suspended. i mean, i think that the people with the boobies in this are the authorities that try to ban them. this is young teenagers doing a good thing. >> you think the kids running around in high school saying i love boobies are saying it for breast cancer awareness? >> i think humor is the best way to get kids to do something, and i think they were making a good point.
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>> i don't like the idea of banning it but over state the level of commitment to anti breast. i think they like boobies. >> it has to actually be disruptive to the educational environment and though it's a humorous message, it conveys something serious about breast cancer. i think it was an overreaction by the school administrators but the court said this is the constitutional right of the students to be a little bit juvenile. >> this show loves boobies, too, when it's in connection to keeping a breast and saving lives. i'm presenting you with -- >> i'm an advocate now. >> put it on. i want to see it on you. >> i'll wear it every time. >> thank you both very much. next, carl bernstein led the downfall of richard nixon. he'll talk about the sale of that and the recent cnn film among other things, the hay
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friday all in family. >> what is this called? don't you know he was talking to a reporter? 4ad. nw(fe
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don't you know he was talking to a reporter? >> yes, but i think i woke him up. >> good notes? >> verbatim. >> he really said that? i got the words [ bleep ] printed. it's a family newspaper. >> a classic scene, jason from "the washington post" ben bradley, robert red ford and dustin hoffman. sold it for $250 million. what does carl bernstein think about this brought down nixon and he's speaking out on the sale tonight for the first time. carl, welcome to you. >> good to be here. >> you may not want to hear this but you're one of the reasons i went into journalism. >> it seems to have paid off for you. you're doing all right.
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>> what is your personal reaction to the fact that the family that you served under for so long sold out now to a dot com billionaire? >> a great sadness given the contribution of the gram family to journalism, to the national good health in terms of promoting a kind of reporting that serves everybody in this country, and a kind of honesty and a kind of principle management. that said, the paper is not economically healthy and like most newspapers and like most news organizations, and i think this could be a great thing for a great institution. >> by the way, jeff is a genius, and a multi-billionaire genius and everybody that uses amazon loves it. it provides everything you could want in life. >> the great hope here is look, our failings are an economic
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model that doesn't work anymore, and hopefully, by having a genous from the internet age, from the internet technology who will help find a model that will preserve the most enduring aspects of journalism and marry it with this culture, that's the hope. we need an economic model, somebody who has deep pockets to sustain great reporting. that's what has been lacking. there are tons of stories out there we're not doing. we don't have a good enough news report, not in the washington post, not even in the new york times. >> right. >> which is right now by far the most successful reporting organization in the world. at the same time very few organizations are doing great reporting. >> i sat next to jeff 12 years ago and he said to me in ten years time you'll be reading this paper on a tablet and i laughed at him.
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i thought it was ridiculous. he said it will be like that and they will bend and you put them in your pocket when you walk around. you have an ipad with you. >> yes. >> that's what he was talking about before anybody else was talking about it and i saw him at a party and he said the bending element is about to come into play as well. he's a genius. >> one of the things he's done is show a willingness to stand by an idea, watch it develop and go through troubled times in the development, continue to fund it and perfect it. that is part of what we need in the newspaper business or the former newspaper business. marry the new technology with the great things we're capable of. >> the one thing -- >> we need entrepreneur of reporting. >> i bet "the washington post" becomes really good. >> i think we're talking less about delivering newspapers than
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using the great platform. >> yeah. >> that digital is and will become even better, but to use it with the thing that journalism is about, the best obtainable -- >> let me come to that -- >> let's talk about the best obtainable version of the truth. we're trying to preserve this and add to it on a great scale. we have seen great reporting because it -- >> let me talk to you about edward snowden, then. that was my next question for you. i remember seeing from the president's work, your charter dustin hoffman playing you met with a contact and trying to get phone records off him. that's in the early '70s. you were deploying that technique to expose watergate and everything else. where is the line to be drawn between what the guardians say and glenn greenwald on behalf of snowden have been doing and where the public interest lies? >> look, it's always a tough
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call. i think what we've seen with snowden is the beginning of a long over due debate about what our government is doing in terms of gathering information and whether it is justified and we needed to know more about what the government is doing. that's snowden's contribution. at the same time, the way he has gone about handling his persona, look, he's -- look at ellsberg, daniel ellsberg with the pentagon papers. this is a form of civil disobedience. he was willing to take the consequences, go to court, stay here, be tried and nixon's excesses, breaking into the psychiatrist office his case was dismissed. in the case of snowden, he ran. that makes him a much more difficult figure to identify with here if he's really interested in the national interest. >> cnn ran this documentary on nixon.
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did you see it by any chance. >> i saw it in early cut. >> it being re-aired tomorrow night on cnn at 10:00. did your view of nixon change over the years? >> no, i'm more empathy to his demons. we know his presidency was much worse than we thought. the criminality of his presidency was worse. we hear it in the tapes all the time. we hear nixon on tape now which we didn't at the time of the coverage in the post say of ordering a break in, a firebombing, a think tank in washington. i don't care what you have to do to get those documents, break into the safe, fire bomb the place, over and over for days on end. he wants that place fire bombed. >> amazing. >> the president of the united states. >> yeah. >> this is -- this is something awful in our history. he was anomalous.
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a criminal presidency. it had it's policy moments, but this is something a part from other presidencies. >> just as a side to all this, dustin huffman played you in that movie was revealed today to have been batting cancer and make a good recovery. i just read that tonight on people.com. so we wish him the best. >> absolutely. >> i could talk to you for hours. i would like to another time. >> happy to do it. >> a great pleasure to see you. >> thank you. coming next, the gender barrier in the nfl could be broken in the season. sarah thomas may be the first female official and joins me after this. . best-in-class 25 mpg. ♪ north american truck of the year. ♪ the truck of texas. ♪ better residual value than ford and chevy.
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i've had a lot of people say, i told you that was a girl when i left the field and had my hair down or something. those are the games i want. i want to go unnoticed just like the other six guys on the field. >> it's going to be hard to go unnoticed. kickoff for the nfl is one month away. and sarah thomas could become the first female full-time official. welcome to you. >> well, thank you. thanks for having me.
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>> we've coined this great phase for you. you're going to smash the grass ceiling. >> that's why i wore green tonight. >> 21 finalists now, but huge pressure on you. how are you dealing with all the attention that comes with the fact you they be the first female nfl official? >> well, when i get to thinking about this, i've never worked a preseason where there's been more focus on the next season. so i just -- i'm brace everything that has been put before me, but really and truly, i'm just focusing on being an official and going out and working the games just like i normally do. >> you're going to be surrounded by these gigantic men. how do they treat you as a rule? are they good to you? are they terrible sexists? what is it like when you get out there with these guys? >> they're professionals.
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this is their job. the collegiate level as well. but when they see me in stripes, i'm just one of the officials that's out there. it just so happens that i am a female. but when we're out there working we're a team and just trying to go unnoticed like i said, and i'm just one of the guys. >> now, i have three teenage sons and we go and watch soccer. one of the joys of that bonding experience is shouting at the referees. now, you've got two sons, 12 and 9, as well as a young daughter. how are they going to react? are they going to go to the football and want to instinctively shout at the referee for a bad call and discover it's their mum? >> i always tell them if i'm coaching them or being a mom to them, don't ever be in a game when you're playing or sitting back watching and let the official make one play that you think blew the game. you've got a lot of opportunities as an athlete, as a player to make a difference
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instead of just thinking about that one call that might affect the outcome of the game. if someone is yelling at me, they're used to it. so this is part of their life. >> have you had some surprising messages of support and good will from people? >> yes, i have. it's been a lot of good support. >> are you nervous? >> no. there's nothing to be nervous about. >> you seem very calm. >> this is what i've been doing for 17 years, and so i feel like i am continuing to prepare and i'm qualified for this coming up season with conference usa and if next season i'm still part of the 21, that's great. if things progress, i'm embrace it like any other season, getting ready to officiate football. >> there's going to be somebody potentially right in the front line of refereeing a great american sport. what do you make of a-rod, that little cheat down the road at
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the yankees? >> i really don't have any comments on that, piers. i just want to stay focused on officiating. >> i knew you were going to say that. you should be a diplomat. >> some may say i am. >> do you have a favorite nfl team? >> no, i don't. and i played college basketball, and there wasn't a football team there. so i think it's just fitting that i am a football official. so i'm not biased. i just have a job to do, a position to manage and get out of there unnoticed. >> you're an absolute credit to your profession. i think it would be terrific for the nfl if you get this opportunity. thank you so much for coming on the show tonight. it's quite obvious why you may be getting this, because you're a very cool customer under fire, whether it's me bombing you with questions or the nfl potentially pitting you in front of all of
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these footballers. bet of it all. >> thank you, piers. >> it would be great for the nfl. she seems perfect to me. we'll be right back. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him.
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brown: on my third day as principal, i met with the state. students had fallen behind, and morale was low. my first job was getting everyone to believe... that we could turn this around. i needed my staff to see what was possible. turning around a school, is not some, mystical, magical thing. it does take hard, dedicated work each day. i was a chemistry major in college, and then... i joined teach for america. that's the reason i'm here. tomorrow night, the fight for medical marijuana takes a very emotional turn as parents say they need it to treat their daughter's disease. now they're asking the new
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jersey governor to change the laws. that's tomorrow night. now erin burnett anchors a cnn special investigation, "the truth about benghazi." good evening, everyone, tonight, why the minute mass killer who wanted to plead guilty for being put to the trial for the government not calling what he did an act of terrorism. also, tonight, this man was alleged a convicted sex offender who violated parole 15 times only to be released again and again. the 16th time. parole officers say if something isn't done, he will not be the last. we're keeping him honest. and later, how does one of the most physically fit presidts

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